Let's Talk: Why Am I So Tired?

We’ve all wondered it – and probably even said it aloud: “Why am I so tired?” There are many factors that can lead to fatigue, including stress, having too much responsibility, not getting restful sleep, and depression or anxiety. We’ve all been there at one point or another. Experts at The Christ Hospital weigh in on what you can do about it. 

Stress

Jennifer Manders, MD, breast surgeon, believes that ongoing stress has a direct impact on your energy levels. 

“It’s supply and demand of energy,” says Dr. Manders. “If you’re not feeding back into your energy supply, you’re not going to have the energy it takes to deal with this whole world of stress.”

Pro tip:

Set aside ten minutes each day for yourself. Read a book, write in your journal, take a short walk or sit quietly and enjoy a cup of coffee. Carving out a few solo minutes a day can help you feel more refreshed to face the day’s challenges.

Never-Ending Responsibility

Sandra Eisele, MD, orthopedic surgeon, cites never-ending responsibility as a key factor in fatigue.

“We work harder and we have more responsibilities than ever before,” says Dr. Eisele. “We have responsibilities at work and responsibilities at home that never end.”

Pro tip:

Write a To-Do list to help manage your daily responsibilities. It also can help to write down a list of tasks and thoughts before bed to help “clear” your brain of any lingering worries and prioritize things.

The Let's Talk doctors from the The Christ Hospital stand in front of a brick wall

Lack of Restorative Sleep

Geraldine Vehr, MD, primary care physician, believes fatigue is multi-faceted – but is also a normal part of our daily lives. 

“Women have jobs, families and homes,” says Dr. Vehr. “Women tend to multitask and being tired is just part of the way we live.”

Pro tip:

Building healthy sleep habits can significantly help you feeling more rested each morning and throughout the day. Dr. Vehr especially recommends limiting alcohol, which can initially help you fall asleep but prevents you from getting deep, restorative sleep.

Depression and Anxiety

Aparna Shah, MD, urogynecologist, says that fatigue is directly associated with depression and anxiety. 

“We’re busy moms – we’re busy women. It’s hard to get enough hours of sleep,” says Dr. Shah. “Fatigue can come from depression, anxiety or just from having a busy lifestyle with a lot of responsibilities.” 

Pro tip:

If you’re feeling depressed or anxious – get help. Make an appointment with your physician and talk through what’s going on in your life. Your physician might recommend lifestyle changes, medication or suggest talking things over with a therapist. It’s important to remember that you’re not alone – and getting help is the first step to feeling more in control of your life and your health. 

Other factors like diet, caffeine intake, and Vitamin D deficiency can also affect feelings of fatigue. Find out what Amanda Valentine, B105 radio personality, learned to do about each of these in her blog, 'How Dr. Lawall is Helping Me Beat Fatigue'.

Would you like to learn more about fatigue and strategies to help overcome it? Schedule an appointment online with one of our primary care physicians today. Our team is here to help!
Women's Health Experts at The Christ Hospital standing against a brick wall.

​Drs. Manders, Eisele, Vehr and Shah are women's health experts who practice at The Christ Hospital in various specialities.

Let's Talk: Why Am I So Tired? In this “Let’s Talk” webisode, some of our women's health experts weigh in on reasons for fatigue – and share some tips to help combat feeling tired.
We’ve all wondered it – and probably even said it aloud: “Why am I so tired?” There are many factors that can lead to fatigue, including stress, having too much responsibility, not getting restful sleep, and depression or anxiety. We’ve all been there at one point or another. Experts at The Christ Hospital weigh in on what you can do about it. 

Stress

Jennifer Manders, MD, breast surgeon, believes that ongoing stress has a direct impact on your energy levels. 

“It’s supply and demand of energy,” says Dr. Manders. “If you’re not feeding back into your energy supply, you’re not going to have the energy it takes to deal with this whole world of stress.”

Pro tip:

Set aside ten minutes each day for yourself. Read a book, write in your journal, take a short walk or sit quietly and enjoy a cup of coffee. Carving out a few solo minutes a day can help you feel more refreshed to face the day’s challenges.

Never-Ending Responsibility

Sandra Eisele, MD, orthopedic surgeon, cites never-ending responsibility as a key factor in fatigue.

“We work harder and we have more responsibilities than ever before,” says Dr. Eisele. “We have responsibilities at work and responsibilities at home that never end.”

Pro tip:

Write a To-Do list to help manage your daily responsibilities. It also can help to write down a list of tasks and thoughts before bed to help “clear” your brain of any lingering worries and prioritize things.

The Let's Talk doctors from the The Christ Hospital stand in front of a brick wall

Lack of Restorative Sleep

Geraldine Vehr, MD, primary care physician, believes fatigue is multi-faceted – but is also a normal part of our daily lives. 

“Women have jobs, families and homes,” says Dr. Vehr. “Women tend to multitask and being tired is just part of the way we live.”

Pro tip:

Building healthy sleep habits can significantly help you feeling more rested each morning and throughout the day. Dr. Vehr especially recommends limiting alcohol, which can initially help you fall asleep but prevents you from getting deep, restorative sleep.

Depression and Anxiety

Aparna Shah, MD, urogynecologist, says that fatigue is directly associated with depression and anxiety. 

“We’re busy moms – we’re busy women. It’s hard to get enough hours of sleep,” says Dr. Shah. “Fatigue can come from depression, anxiety or just from having a busy lifestyle with a lot of responsibilities.” 

Pro tip:

If you’re feeling depressed or anxious – get help. Make an appointment with your physician and talk through what’s going on in your life. Your physician might recommend lifestyle changes, medication or suggest talking things over with a therapist. It’s important to remember that you’re not alone – and getting help is the first step to feeling more in control of your life and your health. 

Other factors like diet, caffeine intake, and Vitamin D deficiency can also affect feelings of fatigue. Find out what Amanda Valentine, B105 radio personality, learned to do about each of these in her blog, 'How Dr. Lawall is Helping Me Beat Fatigue'.

Would you like to learn more about fatigue and strategies to help overcome it? Schedule an appointment online with one of our primary care physicians today. Our team is here to help!
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The Christ Hosptial