Navigation

Gastrointestinal cancer treatment

If you have gastrointestinal cancer, you'll find exceptional care and emotional encouragement at The Christ Hospital Health Network. Even if your cancer is rare or aggressive, you can fight back with our advanced treatments and support services.

About gastrointestinal cancer

"Gastrointestinal cancer" is a broad term. It describes several kinds of cancer that form in the gastrointestinal tract (digestive system). These cancers include:

  • Anal cancer

  • Appendicular Cancer (appendix) 

  • Bile duct cancer

  • Carcinoid tumors which often occur in the appendix, small intestine or rectum

  • Colon cancer and rectal cancer (also known as colorectal cancer)

  • Esophageal (esophagus) cancer

  • Gallbladder cancer

  • Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), which usually develop in the stomach or small intestine

  • Liver cancer  including hepatocellular carcinoma

  • Pancreatic cancer

  • Small intestine cancer

  • Stomach cancer

Some types of gastrointestinal cancer, such as colorectal cancer, are relatively common. They can be detected early through routine screening exams. Other types, including small intestine and gallbladder cancer, are considered rare. They may not be diagnosed until they have reached an advanced stage. That's why it's important to talk to your doctor as soon as you notice unusual symptoms.

Why choose The Christ Hospital Health Network

Our cancer care team has extensive experience managing even the most challenging types of gastrointestinal cancer.

Besides offering the latest treatment options, our team takes pride in exceeding patient expectations. We provide personalized care in a warm and nurturing environment, where our patients often say they feel like family members. 

If you're interested in new or integrative therapies, The Christ Hospital Health Network offers both. Many patients benefit from our "complementary and alternative" therapies, including Tai Chi classes, music therapy and pet therapy. Others take part in cancer-related clinical trials.